"Many people learn how to talk, but they don't learn how to listen. Listening to one another is an important thing in life. And music tells us how to do that."
— Claudio Abbado
Italian conductor, born June 26, 1933

"Do not teach your children never to get angry; teach them how to get angry."
— Lyman Abbott
American theologian, born December 18, 1835

"We are coming down from our pedestal and up from the laundry room."
— Bella Abzug
American lawyer and politician, born July 24, 1920

"Life goes on, having nowhere else to go."
— Diane Ackerman
American author, poet, born October 7, 1948

"It began in mystery, and it will end in mystery, but what a savage and beautiful country lies in between."
— Diane Ackerman
American poet, born October 7, 1948

"Everyone admits that love is wonderful and necessary, yet no one agrees on just what it is."
— Diane Ackerman
American poet, born October 7, 1948

"A poem records emotions and moods that lie beyond normal language, that can only be patched together and hinted at metaphorically."
— Diane Ackerman
American poet, born October 7, 1948

"Love is the best school, but the tuition is high and the homework can be painful."
— Diane Ackerman
American poet, born October 7, 1948

"What a lonely species we are, searching for signals of life from other galaxies, adopting companion animals, visiting parks and zoos to commune with other beasts."
— Diane Ackerman
American poet, born October 7, 1948

"We tend to think of heroes only in terms of violent combat, whether it's against enemies or a natural disaster. But human beings also perform radical acts of compassion; we just don't talk about them, or we don't talk about them as much."
— Diane Ackerman
American poet, born October 7, 1948

"Just as our ancient ancestors drew animals on cave walls and carved animals from wood and bone, we decorate our homes with animal prints and motifs, give our children stuffed animals to clutch, cartoon animals to watch, animal stories to read."
— Diane Ackerman
American poet, born October 7, 1948

"I'm fascinated how often and with what whole-heartedness people will risk their lives to perform acts of courage, sacrifice, and compassion for total strangers."
— Diane Ackerman
American poet, born October 7, 1948

"Even without seeing the crickets, grasshoppers, cicadas and katydids, we hear them shrilling in this season and trust that they're the tiny living gargoyles entomologists claim."
— Diane Ackerman
American poet, born October 7, 1948

"We ogle plants and animals up close on television, the Internet and in the movies. We may not worship the animals we see, but we still regard them as necessary physical and spiritual companions. Technological nature can't completely satisfy that yearning."
— Diane Ackerman
American poet, born October 7, 1948

"Gardeners may create order briefly out of chaos, but nature always gets the last word, and what it says is usually untidy by human standards. But I find all states of nature beautiful, and because I want to delight in my garden, not rule it, I just accept my yen to tame the chaos on one day and let the Japanese beetles run riot on the next."
— Diane Ackerman
American poet, born October 7, 1948

"I believe in growing things, and in the things which have grown and died magnificently. I believe in people and in the simple aspects of human life, and in the relation of man to nature. I believe man must be free, both in spirit and society, that he must build strength into himself, affirming the "enormous beauty of the world" and acquiring the confidence to see and to express his vision. And I believe in photography as one means of expressing this affirmation, and of achieving an ultimate happiness and faith."
— Ansel Adams
American photographer and environmentalist, died April 22, 1984

"A photograph is usually looked at—seldom looked into."
— Ansel Adams
American photographer, born February 20, 1902

"There is nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept."
— Ansel Adams
American photographer, born February 20, 1902

"The negative is the equivalent of the composer's score, and the print the performance."
— Ansel Adams
American photographer, born February 20, 1902

"It is an important and popular fact that things are not always what they seem. For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligence than dolphins because he had achieved so much--the wheel, New York, wars, and so on--whilst all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man--for precisely the same reason."
— Douglas Adams
English writer and humorist, born March 11, 1952
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