"Healing is coming to terms with things as they are. That’s very different from curing. With curing, there is an expectation that things will be restored as they were before."
— Jon Kabat-Zinn
Director of Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, born June 5, 1944

"In Asian languages, the word for 'mind' and the word for 'heart' are same. So if you're not hearing mindfulness in some deep way as heartfulness, you're not really understanding it. Compassion and kindness towards oneself are intrinsically woven into it. You could think of mindfulness as wise and affectionate attention."
— Jon Kabat-Zinn
Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, born June 5, 1944

"It is what makes us human, what distinguishes us from other animals. We can be aware of being aware."
— Jon Kabat-Zinn
Center for Mindfulness in Medicine, born June 5, 1944

"Since the fall of Adam, Man's soul has been naked. God gave him a body in this world so that he could use it to do good deeds, which would sculpt him into God's image and clothe him in garments of light when he returns."
— Kabbalah
The foundational work of Jewish mystical thought

"First we receive the light, then we impart it. Thus we repair the world."
— Kabbalah
Esoteric teachings

"When one person touches another with an act of kindness, their lights fuse for a moment, and from that union, an angel is born."
— Kabbalah

"I laugh when I hear that fish in the water are thirsty."
— Kabir
Mystic, poet, and saint of India, born 1398

"The river that flows in you also flows in me."
— Kabir
Indian mystic poet, born in 1440

"All darkness vanished, when I saw the Lamp within my heart."
— Kabir
Mystic poet and saint of India, born in 1440

"I sell mirrors in the city of the blind."
— Kabir
Indian mystic poet, born in 1440

"But if a mirror ever makes you sad, you should know that it does not know you."
— Kabir
Indian mystic poet, born in 1440

"If I make the seven oceans ink, if I make the trees my pen, if I make the earth my paper, the glory of God cannot be written."
— Kabir
Indian mystic poet, born in 1440

"You do not have to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen; simply wait. Do not even wait; be quiet still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked. It has no choice. It will roll in ecstasy at your feet."
— Franz Kafka
German-language writer, born July 3, 1883

"I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us. If the book we are reading doesn't wake us up with a blow on the head, what are we reading it for? ...we need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us."
— Franz Kafka
German-language writer, born July 3, 1883

"These are the seductive voices of the night; the Sirens, too, sang that way. It would be doing them an injustice to think that they wanted to seduce; they know they had claws and sterile wombs, and they lamented this aloud. They could not help it if their laments sounded so beautiful."
— Franz Kafka
German-language writer, born July 3, 1883

"You can hold yourself back from the sufferings of the world, that is something you are free to do and it accords with your nature, but perhaps this very holding back is the one suffering you could avoid."
— Franz Kafka
German-language writer, died June 3, 1924

"A belief is like a guillotine, just as heavy, just as light."
— Franz Kafka
German-language writer, born July 3, 1883

"A cage went in search of a bird."
— Franz Kafka
German-language writer, born July 3, 1883

"I can’t think of any greater happiness than to be with you all the time, without interruption, endlessly, even though I feel that here in this world there’s no undisturbed place for our love, neither in the village nor anywhere else; and I dream of a grave, deep and narrow, where we could clasp each other in our arms as with clamps, and I would hide my face in you and you would hide your face in me, and nobody would ever see us any more."
— Franz Kafka
German-language writer, born July 3, 1883  

"Life's splendor forever lies in wait about each one of us in all its fullness, but veiled from view, deep down, invisible, far off. It is there, though, not hostile, not reluctant, not deaf. If you summon it by the right word, by its right name, it will come."
— Franz Kafka
German-language writer, born July 3, 1883